1. Though the day-to-day exchanges were often trivial, the underlying dynamics of the election were deadly serious, and everybody knew what they were. As both candidates repeatedly said, it was about what sort of country we want to be. Now, the American public has rendered a judgement.

    — John Cassidy on Obama’s reëlection: http://nyr.kr/Tu1NX0 (via newyorker)

  2. newyorker:


Two debates took place in Boca Raton on Monday night, one embedded inside the other. Given that the candidates and moderator had only ninety minutes to work with, the intrusion of domestic issues couldn’t have helped but take away from the foreign-policy discussion. That is a cause for real regret—the world they talked about didn’t extend much beyond the Middle East and China anyway. But taken on its own terms, the second, shadow debate was not a bad one. It was surprisingly detailed, and the exchanges were in some ways more direct than the ones on foreign policy and even more so than previous ones on domestic issues. Despite the assumption that any mention of the economy would be bad for the President, it was also a fight Obama largely controlled. He won a solid victory on foreign policy in large part because he was more coherent than Romney in talking about things that had nothing to do with foreign policy.

Amy Davidson on the two debates in Boca Raton last Monday night: http://nyr.kr/XeYwAq
Read Dexter Filkins on Romney’s foreign policy and Evan Osnos on the candidates’ comments about China, and see our full coverage of the Presidential debates.
Photograph by Nikki Kahn/Washington Post/Getty.

    newyorker:

    Two debates took place in Boca Raton on Monday night, one embedded inside the other. Given that the candidates and moderator had only ninety minutes to work with, the intrusion of domestic issues couldn’t have helped but take away from the foreign-policy discussion. That is a cause for real regret—the world they talked about didn’t extend much beyond the Middle East and China anyway. But taken on its own terms, the second, shadow debate was not a bad one. It was surprisingly detailed, and the exchanges were in some ways more direct than the ones on foreign policy and even more so than previous ones on domestic issues. Despite the assumption that any mention of the economy would be bad for the President, it was also a fight Obama largely controlled. He won a solid victory on foreign policy in large part because he was more coherent than Romney in talking about things that had nothing to do with foreign policy.

    Amy Davidson on the two debates in Boca Raton last Monday night: http://nyr.kr/XeYwAq

    Read Dexter Filkins on Romney’s foreign policy and Evan Osnos on the candidates’ comments about China, and see our full coverage of the Presidential debates.

    Photograph by Nikki Kahn/Washington Post/Getty.

  3. (Source: current.com)

  4. Next week, the candidates devote an entire debate to foreign policy. After they are done arguing about who is a better friend of Israel or a more devoted enemy of the Taliban and Iran, what will they possibly talk about? Romney and Vice-Presidential nominee Paul Ryan have both been repeating lately that Obama’s foreign policy is “unravelling before our eyes.” That is such a strange, vacant stretch of an argument that it will be entertaining to watch Romney try to extend it across ninety minutes. Surely by now, when he looks abroad, he no longer trusts his instincts.

    — - Steve Coll on the Libya moment during the second Presidential debate, and Romney’s foreign policy limitations: http://nyr.kr/TxlMVm (via newyorker)

  5. I swear I could hear liberals and Democrats all across the city—make that all across the country—leaping to their feet and shouting, “You go, Barack!” This was the Obama they had been looking for in Denver a couple of weeks ago.

    — John Cassidy on last night’s Presidential debate: http://nyr.kr/QTKqjJ (via newyorker)

  6. kileyrae:

“The gridlock you see in Washington doesn’t exist in neighborhoods, cities and towns all across America… The American people are a lot more decent and full of commonsense than we’ve seen in Washington the last several years.”
- President Obama
(Photo via The New York Times)

    kileyrae:

    The gridlock you see in Washington doesn’t exist in neighborhoods, cities and towns all across America… The American people are a lot more decent and full of commonsense than we’ve seen in Washington the last several years.”

    - President Obama

    (Photo via The New York Times)

  7. "Libya Surprise" Could Be Death Knell for Romney Campaign →

    newyorker:

    John Cassidy breaks down the order of events in Cairo, Libya, and the U.S. over the past 24 hours, and considers how they might affect the Romney and Obama’s campaigns: http://nyr.kr/OHoY02

    There will be plenty of time to discuss the rights and wrongs. But before getting into all that, I thought it might be worth setting down how the past twenty-four hours unfolded. With events taking place in three countries, on two continents, there has been a lot of confusion about who said what when. Here’s a quick timeline I put together from the Web. As far as I can see, Romney doesn’t come out of it looking any better….

  8. brooklynmutt:

    President Obama’s DNC Speech: ‘I Have Never Been More Hopeful About America’

    Intro video here

  9. newyorker:

Clinton’s Speech: The Power of a Hug

…it was exactly their lack of personal chemistry and failure to become “close friends” that gave Clinton’s speech its lift. A subtext of the address was that, just like Bill Clinton, wavering voters need not love Obama to understand that he’s a better choice than Romney. When the two Presidents came together and hugged after the speech was (finally) over, the distance between them made their embrace all the more powerful.

Ryan Lizza on Bill Clinton’s speech in support of President Obama at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte last night: http://nyr.kr/RbCIoj
Photograph by Alex Wong/Getty Images.

    newyorker:

    Clinton’s Speech: The Power of a Hug

    …it was exactly their lack of personal chemistry and failure to become “close friends” that gave Clinton’s speech its lift. A subtext of the address was that, just like Bill Clinton, wavering voters need not love Obama to understand that he’s a better choice than Romney. When the two Presidents came together and hugged after the speech was (finally) over, the distance between them made their embrace all the more powerful.

    Ryan Lizza on Bill Clinton’s speech in support of President Obama at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte last night: http://nyr.kr/RbCIoj

    Photograph by Alex Wong/Getty Images.

  10. The "New Obama" →

    newyorker:

    …she threw off the cloak of domesticity that she has been wearing for the past three and a half years and emerged as a major figure in her own right.

    John Cassidy on First Lady Michelle Obama’s speech at the Democratic National Convention last night: http://nyr.kr/Oa5m9d

  11. Serious issue, but it is surreal hearing serious establishment media outlets gravely referring to “Pussy Riot”.

    Serious issue, but it is surreal hearing serious establishment media outlets gravely referring to “Pussy Riot”.